Sex life details leaked in BBC data breaches 

Exclusive figures reveal the broadcaster has reported dozens of incidents to the Information Commissioner's Office

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The BBC said it is 'not immune' to criminal activity
The BBC said it is 'not immune' to criminal activity Credit: PA

BBC databases are being regularly breached with hackers accessing sex life data and other personal information from members of the public, it has been revealed.

The broadcaster has suffered dozens of serious breaches since 2018 with an average of at least one reported incident each month.

Information held about members of the public, including data concerning their sex lives or their children, has been accessed through BBC records. 

The corporation said it is “not immune” to crime which has led to the release of sensitive personal information.

Since May 2018 there have been 38 serious data breaches at the BBC, The Daily Telegraph can reveal.

Figures show that 33 of these incidents involved the data of members of the public.

Hundreds of ordinary people and potentially thousands of BBC staff could have been affected by the string of breaches at the corporation.

Information on people’s health, finances, location, families, and sex lives has been accessed. 

Political opinions, official documents, identification data, and records of criminal offences and convictions have also been subject to breaches.

The largest single incident reported by the BBC to the Information Commissioner's Office involved the broadcaster's own employees, with more than 1,000 becoming victims of a data breach in one case.

Most of the 38 breaches affected around 10 individuals, with five impacting around up to 100 people each.  

In online guidance the broadcaster states it holds most details in order “to make the BBC better for you and for everyone”. 

Data can also shared with TV Licencing, which enforces payment for the broadcaster's services. 

Victims could be viewers, those who have contributed to the BBC, or anyone with reason to have their information held by the broadcaster. 

A BBC spokesman said, “We have rigorous systems in place to protect the data we hold for our staff and audiences and take seriously our duty to report any suspected personal data incidents. 

“However, as with any business, neither the BBC nor its staff are immune from crime which can sometimes result in a data breach even when security measures have been put in place.”

The BBC said that most incidents related to basic personal information which could identify an individual.  

It is understood that the majority of victims of these incidents are BBC staff, although the corporation would not comment on whether it was being specifically targeted.